Teaching Schedule

Date

Day

Course

Time

Room

Lecturer

21/11/2017

Tuesday

competenze trasversali

14.30-18.30

G24

 

 15/11/2017

 Wednesday

 Medical Statistic 1

 13.30-17.30

 310

 Paola Crepaldi

  22/11/2017

 Wednesday

 Medical Statistic 1

 13.30-17.30

 310

 Paola Crepaldi

  29/11/2017

 Wednesday

 Medical Statistic 1

 13.30-17.30

 310

 Paola Crepaldi

06/12/2017 

 Wednesday

 Medical Statistic 1

 13.30-17.30

 310

 Paola Crepaldi

 13/12/2017 

 Wednesday

 Medical Statistic 1

 13.30-17.30

 310

 Paola Crepaldi

 20/12/2017

 Wednesday

 Medical Statistic 1

 13.30-17.30

 310

 Paola Crepaldi

 25/01/2018

 Thursday

 Bibliographic Data Bases

 09.15-13.15

 Lab C7, Via Mangiagalli, 25

Angela Moccia

 01/02/2018

 Thursday

  Bibliographic Data Bases

 09.30-12.30

 Lab C7, Via Mangiagalli, 25

Angela Moccia

 22/02/2018

 Thursday

  Bibliographic Data Bases

 09.30-12.30

 Lab C7, Via Mangiagalli, 25

 Angela Moccia

 22/02/2018

 Thursday

  Bibliographic Data Bases

 13.30-15.30

 Lab C7, Via Mangiagalli, 25

 Angela Moccia

 23/01/2018

 Tuesday

 Communication 1

 14.00-18.00

 

Ettore Galanti

 06/02/2018

 Tuesday

 Communication 1

 14.00-18.00

 

 Ettore Galanti

 20/02/2018

 Tuesday

 Communication 1

 14.00-18.00

 

 Ettore Galanti

 07/05/2018

 Monday

 Digital Imaging

 08.30-13.30

 

 Valentina Lodde

 07/05/2018

 Monday

 Digital Imaging (group A)

 14.30-17.30

 Lab microscopia sez anatomia

 Valentina Lodde

 08/05/2018

 Tuesday

 Digital Imaging (Group B)

 09.30-12.30

  Lab microscopia sez anatomia

 Valentina Lodde

 08/05/2018

Tuesday

 Digital Imaging (Group C)

 13.30-16.30

  Lab microscopia sez anatomia

 Valentina Lodde

 09/05/2018

 Wednesday

 Digital Imaging

 09.30-13.30

 

 Valentina Lodde

 10/05/2018

 Thursday

 Digital Imaging

 09.30-12.30

 

 Valentina Lodde

11/05/2018

Friday

Digital Imaging

09.30-12.30

 

Valentina Lodde

Barros/Luciano

Rodrigo Garcia Barros graduated in September of 2016 in Animal biotechnology science master’s degree at Universidade Estadual Paulista “Julio de Mesquita Filho” - UNESP (Brazil; Tutor: Prof. Dr. José Buratini) with the thesis entitled “Influence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus oocyte complexes” and graduated in Veterinary Medicine at the same University in December of 2013. His research interests are mainly in molecular biology and manipulation of the oocyte in vitro and in vivo through the development of follicular synchronization protocols, focusing on the improvement of the culture system strategies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alberto M. Luciano, MSc., PhD, graduated in 1991 at University of Milan. He completed a PhD program in Biotechnology applied to Veterinary Sciences at University of Milan and a Post-Doctorate appointment in Reproductive Physiology at University of Connecticut, School of Medicine, CT, USA. He is associate professor of Anatomy and Histology, at the Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, University of Milan, and team leader of the Reproductive and Developmental Biology Laboratory (www.redbiolab.unimi.it ). Research interests focus on the mechanisms that regulate mammalian oocyte development. Details on ongoing projects, active collaborations and recent scientific publications at RedbioLab web site (http://www.redbiolab.unimi.it).

 

Title: Development of a new oocyte in vitro maturation strategies to enhance the outcome of assisted reproductive technologies

Oocyte developmental competence is acquired progressively throughout folliculogenesis and during the final stages of follicle growth right before ovulation (Dieleman et al. 2002). Oocytes recovered for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and in vitro embryo production (IVP) are still immature and thus are first subjected to a culture step known as in vitro maturation (IVM). IVM has been considered the main technological bottleneck for artificial reproductive technologies, as it still fails to promote oocyte developmental competence as achieved in vivo (Rizos et al. 2001). The challenge is even bigger for oocytes originated from early antral follicles (<2 mm in diameter), which have not yet acquired competence to spontaneously resume meiosis (Pavlok et al. 1992, Blondin & Sirard 1995). The development of a culture system capable of making competent oocytes from early antral follicles attracts great interest because it would drastically increase the number of utilizable gametes from valuable animals from a production or preservation point of view. In addition, in the clinical practice this can be particularly important in treating women infertility and decrease the use of hormones in stimulatory treatments for IVF cycles.

The aim of this study is to develop a sequential culture system that mimics the physiological environment accompanying the oocyte from the early antral to the preovulatory stage of follicle development that can enhance oocyte embryonic developmental competence in IVM/IVF protocols for cattle. A combination of pre-maturation (pre-IVM) and IVM media recently shown by our group able to enhance cumulus-oocyte communication, to slow meiosis dynamics and to improve embryo quality (Soares et al. 2017) will be used as the basic concept for this new culture system. A series of experiments has been designed to assess the effects of the pre-IVM and IVM culture steps on oocyte-cumulus communication, oocyte growth and transcriptional activity, oocyte chromatin remodeling and nuclear maturation dynamics, cumulus expansion and ultimately on oocyte developmental competence acquisition as assessed by in vitro embryo production following IVF and pregnancy after transfer. The study will gain insights from retrospective in-silico analysis of bovine oocyte, cumulus cells and embryo transcriptomic data, generated in collaboration with the EmbryoGENE Network (http://emb-bioinfo.fsaa.ulaval.ca) (Dieci et al., 2016).

The research program will take advantage also from the expertise of Prof. José Buratini Jr., head of the Laboratory of Ovarian Molecular Physiology of the Department of Physiology, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil, acting as co-tutor. An International Cooperation Agreement (2016-2021) and a Technology Transfer agreement (PCT/2016/90005) are already ongoing between the two institutions.

(Project page on Redbiolab: http://users.unimi.it/redbiolab/RedBioLab/proj_barros.html).

UNIMI research team: R. Barros, F. Franciosi (scientific advisor), V. Lodde, A.M. Luciano (tutor)

UNESP research team: C.A. Soares, J.N. Sakoda, J. Buratini (co-tutor)

Bardi/Romussi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edoardo Bardi graduated in October 2015 (110/110 cum laude) by the University of Milan, with a thesis entitled “Parasitological survey on captive reptiles (Reptilia: Squamata)”. He has always been focused on non conventional animal medicine, and during his academic years he has attended clinics specialized in exotic animals both in Italy and Germany. After graduation he has worked as keeper and veterinarian by the Pombia Safari Park (NO), as exotic animal practitioner by several clinics in Milan and as volunteer veterinarian by the LIPU wildlife rescue centre in Magenta (MI). He is author an co-author of 3 scientific works that were presented at the 3rd International Conference on Avian, heRpetological and Exotic mammal medicine (ICARE, March 2017, Venice, Italy). In May 2017 he spent a month in India by the Madras Crocodile Bank Trust, working as a volunteer veterinarian and carrying out research projects regarding crocodiles and endangered turtle species parasitology and hematology. In October 2017 he obtained the ESVPS international qualification of General Practitioner in Exotic Animal Practice (GPCert: ExAP).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stefano Romussi graduated in Veterinary Medicine in 1990 (110/110 cum laude). Associate professor of veterinary surgery at the Department of Veterinary Medicine – University of Milan since 2001, his main fields of interest are soft tissue surgery, expecially related to ENT diseases in dogs and cats, and endoscopy.

 

Title: Standardization of minimally invasive surgical procedures in wild and captive reptiles.

North american pond slider (Trachemys scripta spp.) is one of the most common species of pet turtles in Italy, but it is also an important example of invasive alien species: since many owners used to abandon them in the wild when they got too big to be kept inside the house, in the last three decades these animals successfully managed to breed and prosper in our enviroment, to the detriment of the more delicate european pond turtle (Emys orbicularis). For this reason, in October 2014 the European Union has passed a Regulation (Reg. EU 1143/2014 - on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species), integrated in July 2016 (Reg. EU 1141/2016 - adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Reg. EU 1143/2014) that definitively makes their commerce, breeding and releasing illegal. This project aims to provide a safe, practical and cheap mean of population control, while determing the feasibility of minimally invasive gonadectomy and standardizing a safe and effective analgesic and peri-operative management in this species. In fact, in recent years only a handful of papers regarding this kind of procedures have been published, all of them describing minimally-invasive surgery applied only on mature, fully grown animals, or on immature gigantic species (such as Galapagos tortoise Chelonoidis niger); furthermore, most of these publications confined themself to merely describing the surgical technique, partially or totally overlooking anaesthetic and analgesic considerations. In this project, we will perform endoscopic-assisted ovariectomy/ovariohysterectomy on mature females, totally endoscopic orchiectomy on males and totally endoscopic ovariectomy on immature females, while comparing the effects of two different analgesic protocols: using a behavioural ethogram, morphine will be used as gold standard to assess post-surgical analgesic efficacy of COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug robenacoxib. Regarding post-surgical pain response and rehabilitation, intrasurgical hemostatic devices (vascular clips vs radiofrequency) and perioperative management (outdoor vs indoor housing) will be compared as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig. 1 – Totally endoscopic ovariectomy in immature female C. niger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig. 2 – Endoscopic-assisted ovariectomy in mature female T. scripta

Hejna/Rossi

Monika Hejna graduated in Biology and Environmental Conservation at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland with an experimental thesis about the quotation of ecosystem services (2014). She won a fellowship, funded by Mipaaf 2015, focused on the environmental impact of nutritional feed additives to improvement of sustainable livestock at the Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, University of Milan (2016).

 

Luciana Rossi graduated in Veterinary Medicine (1999) and got her PhD in Biotechnology applied to veterinary and zootechnical sciences (2002). From 2012 Researcher in Animal Nutrition, scientific area Agr/18 (Animal Nutrition), University of Milan. Main research fields: by-product and innovative additives in animal nutrition; environmental sustainability of livestock; medical molecular farming and genetically modified plants; biotechnologies; nutraceuticals and nutrigenomic in food and feed.

 

Title: Plant-based strategies to control the zinc output from swine livestock

At weaning, piglets often suffer from digestive disorders and growth retardation caused by different changes that represent important stressors with negative effect on health status. To control these problems and thereby limit the losses they cause, a large proportion of animals systematically receive antibiotic treatments in the form of medicated feed.

In the last decennium legislation have aimed at restricting antibiotic use in livestock (EU Reg. 1831/2003) and, in parallel, waiting efficacious alternative to antibiotic compounds, an increased use of zinc oxide (ZnO), at pharmacological doses (1000-3000 mg/kg feed), was observed in the diets of animals to control digestive disorders. In commercial conditions, feeding piglets with high doses of ZnO stimulates piglets daily gain and decreases feed conversion factor. However, as heavy metals Zn tend to accumulate in soil and cause serious environmental pollution of soil and tap-water. The heavy metal contents of animal manures are largely a   content in the feed, which poses a high pollution risk to farmlands.  Moreover, recent studies have shown that Zn used at high concentrations for a longer period might promote the spread of antimicrobial resistance of gut microflora in pigs.

In this project, the attention will be focalized on a plant-based integrated approach to reduce both the zinc output in pig livestock and the use of antibiotic compounds. In particular, in the first phase a phytoremediation approach, as a cost-effective strategy to remove exceeding heavy metals content from the manure, will be developed in order to control the Zn output from pig livestock. In the second phase, innovative seed-based edible vaccines will be produced in order to control verocytotoxic Escherichia coli infections in the weaned piglets. 

          

Giorgi/Bontempo

Silvia Giorgi graduated in Animal Husbandry Sciences and Technologies at the University of Milan in July 2017 with the final mark of 110/110 cum laude. He discussed a thesis entitled: "Use a product rich in polyphenols, green tea and pomegranate extracts, as a possible alternative to antidiarrheal used in weaning piglets" (Supervisor: Prof. Valentino Bontempo). Her research mainly concerns with animal nutrition, the study of new feeds and nutritional strategies to improve animal health, with a particular focus on gut health, in the most critical stages of life. She is deeply interested to find out possible non-invasive methods that could be use to find biomarkers of inflammatory response, without causing any pain or stress to the animals.

Valentino Bontempo is full Professor of Animal Nutrition at the Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety. He is actually Scientific Director of Animal Production Center of Lodi and Director of the postgraduaded School in Animal Nutrition. His research activity is mainly devoted to Animal Nutrition. Main topics have been related to the role of nutrition on animal health. In the last years, effects of functional food on immune response and gut health have been investigated. He contributed to the evaluation of the efficacy and tolerance of feed additives for dossiers preparation aimed to EC registration. 

 

Title: Non invasive markers of inflammation and immune response of monogastrics feed diets without antibiotic during critical phases

The highest productive outputs required for animal production are generally the result of increased feed intake, better digestion and absorption of nutrients. Hereby, it is of high importance to realize improved intestinal health and resistance to systemic challenges. In the past the extensive use of antibiotics as growth promoters (AGP) has largely limited the intestinal dysfunctions leading to an increase of animals production. Since 2006 European Community (EC) banned the use of AGP in order to counteract the phenomenon of antibiotic resistance. However, the use of antibiotic to prevent disease (prophylaxis) and to treat diseases (therapy) is still allowed. Many European countries adopt plan to reduce the use of antimicrobial agents, and other non European Countries are expected to reduce/eliminate the use of antibiotic. EC discourages the use of antibiotic both for the effects on human health and the request of the consumers for animal products antibiotic free. As alternative to AGP, a number of feed have been proposed in order to stimulate productive performance and improve their well-being and gut health, especially during periods of stress such as weaning or dietary change. Among the possible alternatives, particular interest arises in natural substances and extracts rich in polyphenols. Polyphenols are a heterogeneous group of substances that have demonstrated a number of positive health properties, both general and intestinal, but for which further and more detailed studies on their mechanisms of action are needed. Therefore, one of the objectives of this project is to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of nutritional strategies, through the use of natural extracts with high content of polyphenols on growth performance and gut health of piglets and broilers in the most delicate phases of their life. The trials will be carried out through non-invasive methods in order to avoid any pain to the animals. The development and determination of non-invasive methods that do not cause stress or pain to animals to evaluate their health status and the effectiveness of the treatments to which they are subjected therefore has a dual purpose: addressing ever-increasing legislative demands and demonstrating in a practical and fast way the effectiveness of certain treatments. At present, non-invasive methods have been deepened especially in humans. However, in animal production, they are not commonly employed. Therefore, another objective of this project is to use and validate these methods for animal experimentation, exploring all possible uses.

 

1. Chickens and Pig

2. Piglets in weaning